The land of limoncellos

The last stop in our Italian part of study abroad was Sorrento. It’s on the western coast of Italy and was such a vacation away from a vacation. That week we played soccer at the beach, swam at the Bagni della Regina Giovanna, had sunset picnics, went skinny dipping in the ocean, and sang karaoke. Β 

How to make the famous limoncello drink that Sorrento is known for:

  • 10 lemons
  • 1 bottle of vodka
  • 3.5 cups of water
  • 2.5 cups of sugar

Remove peel from the lemons; place the peels in a large pitcher; pour vodka over the peels and cover with plastic wrap; let this sit for four days at room temp.

Stir water and sugar in a a large saucepan until sugar dissolves. Cool completely. Pour the sugary syrup over the vodka mixture. cover and let sit at room temperature overnight. Strain the limoncello and toss out the peels. Keep cold for up to a month.

Saluti!

This is what study abroad taught meΒ about Sorrento:

  • It’s a small town in Campania – Southern Italy with a population of about 16,500 people.
  • It is famous for the limoncello drink and other agricultural productions such as citrus fruits, wine, nuts, olives, and woodcraft.
  • According to Roman historians, it was founded by Liparus, son of Ausonus, who was the king of Ausoni & son of Ulysses of Circe.
  • During the pre-Roman age it was highly influence by Greek civilization; Athenaion was a great sanctuary originally devoted to the cult of Sirens.
  • On June 13, 1558 it was sacked by the Ottoman Navy and 2,000 captives were taken away. the struggle was waged for many decades throughout the Mediterranean.
  • In the 19th century the economy improved majorly because of the development of agriculture, tourism, and trade.
  • In 1861 it became a part of the new Kingdom of Italy.
  • It has since then increased its status as a tourist destination.
  • Click here for more history on Sorrento.

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